No survivors after Lion Air plane crashes into sea in Indonesia

Almost 200 people have been killed after a plane operated by Indonesian budget airline Lion Air crashed into the ocean.

The Boeing 737 MAX 8 lost contact with air traffic control about 13 minutes after taking off from Jakarta’s international airport on Monday morning.

The flight, which had 189 people on board, was bound for Pangkal Pinang in Bangka Belitung province.


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At a press conference overnight, an Indonesian search and rescue agency official said crews had sadly recovered a number of human remains from the crash site in seas off Jakarta.

“We found human body parts such as arms, legs, ears. We have brought them to the police hospital in Jakarta,” the official said.

“My prediction is nobody saved. All dead”.

Confronting photos posted to social media show debris from the plane floating in the sea, as well as body bags from the rescue efforts.

The Department of Foreign Affairs is working to establish if any Australians were on board the doomed aircraft, which has been revealed to have suffered a technical issue on its previous flight.

“The Australian Embassy in Jakarta is making urgent enquiries with local authorities to determine if any Australians were on board the flight,”

Indonesia’s Lion Air is known for its chequered air safety history, with more than a dozen accidents in almost 20 years.

It’s not yet known what went wrong, with investigators working to establish the circumstances surrounding the crash.

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There is unconfirmed reports that the fault the previous day was related to unreliable airspeed data at the captains instruments while the FO instrument indicated reliable air speed data. There is also some that claim they can see the same patterns of unstable (faulty?) air speed data on the Flight Radar ADS-B plots for the flight the previous day as well as the accident flight.