Border wall starts to come down as Qld prepares to fully reopen

Crews have already begun removing concrete barriers along the border ahead of the scrapping of all domestic travel restrictions tomorrow.

The state government announced on Thursday that border checkpoints would come down at 1am on Saturday despite Queensland not yet being at 90 per cent double dose vaccination.

The Chief Health Officer advised the Premier the checkpoints had done their job in buying Queensland some time, but were no longer necessary.


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The move has come as a massive sigh of relief to border residents after two years of pain and frustration.

Currumbin MP Laura Gerber says the removal of checkpoints is a big win for locals.

“I think that all the credit needs to go to the community for fighting so hard to be heard. But let’s face it, it’s been a hard fight. The community has had to do petitions, protests, there’s been so much that’s been done by the community in order to be heard,” Ms Gerber said.

“I’m just so relieved that finally the community has some certainty, and also Police resources will no longer be wasted on that border.”

Anyone will be able to enter Queensland from tomorrow regardless of their vaccination status and will no longer need a border pass or a negative rapid antigen test.

Queensland Tourism Industry Council CEO Daniel Gschwind says that is an enormous relief and a long time coming.

“We’ve just about reached 90 per cent double vaccination rate in Queensland now. That’s always been promised that we would ease restrictions and given the debacle that we’ve seen with the testing over the last month or so this is an absolutely necessary step to remove an obstacle for people to move freely,” Mr Gschwind told Seven.

“We are very, very fortunate to now finally being able to welcome guests again without the huge obstacle of the tests that have been so hard to come by.”

Mr Gschwind says the next step for the industry was the removal of restrictions on international travel which will happen when the state does hit 90 per cent double dose.

“For many businesses that have been entirely geared towards the international market, this has been a very, very difficult two years so we will need those visitors back.

“We also nee the workers back. The international students, the working holiday visa holders, the skilled migrants, all of them we need for our industry particularly at this time when we have enormous staff shortages.