Coles to introduce ‘Quiet Hour’ in supermarkets from today

FROM today, people with Austism and their families will be able to do the grocery shopping without having to worry about the bright lights and noises, with 68 Coles stores around the country introducing ‘Quiet Hour’.

For an hour every Tuesday, Coles Supermarkets will dim their lights by 50 per cent, switch the radio off and reduce register and scanner volume to the lowest level.

Trolley collections will also be halted during Quiet Hour, whilst announcements over the PA system will be limited to only emergencies.


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The nationwide roll-out of the low sensory shopping experience comes after Coles partnered with Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect) in August to trial Quiet Hour at two Victorian stores.

Coles accessibility sponsor Peter Sheean said it was a way to “meet the differing needs” of customers.

“We are always looking at ways we can meet the differing needs of our customers by creating a shopping environment in which our customers and team members feel comfortable,” Mr Sheean said.

“Through Quiet Hour, we hope to make a difference to our customers who find it challenging to shop in a heightened sensory environment.”

Coles chose to introduce Quiet Hour between 10.30am – 11.30am every Tuesday after research revealed one of the most common times for people with Autism and their family members and carers preferred to shop was Tuesday mornings.

“Although we have modified some of the physical and sensory stimulators in store, we also hope to achieve a ‘no-judgement’ shopping space for people and families on the spectrum, where customers will feel comfortable and welcome,” Mr Sheean said.

WATCH:

Here are all of the Coles supermarkets that will be participating in Quiet Hour:

QLD    Cairns Central

QLD    Maryborough

QLD    Caloundra

QLD    Kippa Ring

QLD    Cleveland

QLD    Everton Park

QLD    Newfarm

QLD    Rockhampton South

QLD    Townsville Annandale

QLD    Mt Gravatt

QLD    Marsden

QLD    Toowoomba

QLD    Helensvale

QLD    Mudgeeraba

NSW   Warners Bay

NSW   Old Bar

NSW   Wadalba

NSW   Lisarow

NSW   Inverell

NSW   Banora Point

NSW   Medowie

NSW   Wellington

NSW   Bega

NSW   Ulladulla

NSW   Wattle Grove

NSW   Moss Vale

NSW   Kings Langley

NSW   Goulburn

NSW   Manly Vale

NSW   Castle Hill

NSW   Epping

NSW   Caringbah

NSW   Brighton-Le-Sands

NSW   Pyrmont

SA       Tea Tree Plaza

SA       Parkholme

SA       Anzac Highway

SA       Mount Barker

SA       Port Pirie

NT       Casuarina – Bradshaw St

TAS    Newtown

VIC     Wendouree

VIC     Belmont

VIC     Brunswick West

VIC     Burnside

VIC     Altona Meadows

VIC     Essendon Fields

VIC     Pakenham Lakeside

VIC     Ferntree Gully

VIC     Ringwood

VIC     Brandon Park

VIC     Langwarrin

VIC     Cranbourne West

VIC     Benalla

VIC     Prahran

VIC     Brighton

VIC     Eltham

VIC     Balwyn East

VIC     Fitzroy

WA      Margaret River

WA      Erskine

WA      Southern River

WA      South Lakes

WA      Mundaring

WA      Floreat

WA      Hillarys

WA      Kalgoorlie

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Wonderful! I am not on the spectrum, but I find the noisy music a lot to handle sometimes. Thank you Coles, for making this move. It will appeal to a large range of personality types.

Only one store in Tasmania?

Why on earth is the largest inland city in New South Wales not included in this list we have 2 Coles Supermarkets here surely one of them could introduce quiet Tuesday very disappointed Also this time would be ideal for carers and people living with dementia to go shopping as well as noise over stimulates people with dementia as well.

A positive step, but a small tentative one. I would suggest 2-3 hours a day to begin with – nationwide… worldwide! The radio noise in stores (not just Coles) is a blight on the landscape – not just for people with “afflictions” or in the so-called “spectrum”, but anyone who loathes having unwanted noise thrust on them (without their consent); the latter are very much part of the demographics who want peace and quiet (this goes for many places and venues – even surgeries and hospitals!).