Man allegedly smuggled pseudoephedrine in wedding invitations

A man has been charged after he was allegedly busted importing five kilograms of pseudoephedrine into the country.

Australian Border Force officers came across the drug haul after becoming suspicious of an air cargo consignment containing wedding invitations and dresses on February 20.

“On closer inspection, the officers identified small plastic bags in the lining of the wedding invitations which contained a white substance,” Border Force police said.


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The substance tested positive to pseudoephedrine, which is an illegal precursorcommonly used in the manufacture of methamphetamine or ice.

Following investigations into the import, officers yesterday executed three search warrants in Arncliffe, Bexley and Revesby in NSW.

A 20-year-old man was arrested at the Bexley property, where mobile phones and other devices were also seized.

PHOTO: ABF Newsroom

The man has since been charged with one count of intentionally importing into Australia a commercial quantity of a border controlled precursor, one count of contravening request in s201A order, being for a serious offence and one count of hindering Commonwealth official.

He appeared at Sutherland Local Court yesterday and was granted bail to reappear in court on September 14.

According to authorities, the maximum penalty he could face for importing a commercial quantity of a border controlled precursor is 25 years imprisonment and/or a fine of $1,050,000.

ABF Regional Investigations NSW Superintendent Garry Low said officers are committed to stopping precursor drugs, such as pseudoephedrine, from entering Australia.

“Criminals shouldn’t assume the ABF is only focused on finding illicit drugs and that they have a better chance of smuggling precursors into the country. That’s just not the case,” Superintendent Low said.

“ABF officers regularly find and stop precursors at the border, which disrupts the local manufacture of illicit drugs, deprives criminal syndicates of a product to sell, and keeps these dangerous drugs off our streets.”

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