The death of smoking

Anyone born after 2001 can’t smoke – well they can, it’s just illegal for them to do so.

This idea makes a monumentally amount of good, common sense that it is one of those things you sit back and wonder why it hasn’t happened already.

Think about it, there is NO loser in this (aside from big tobacco of course but they’ve had a pretty good run).


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Non-smokers can rejoice knowing that smoking is on its way out and that a new generation of kids will be less and less exposed to it.

Parents will be overjoyed by the fact that it will be illegal for their teenagers and young adults to smoke (as opposed to just wrong and stupid).

Politicians can stand up extoling the virtues of a healthier Australia all the while knowing their bottom line (cigarette tax) won’t be really effective until many years after they have returned from politics.

And not even the smokers can complain – under the proposed ban anyone aged 16 or over would be still free to legally ruin their lungs, reduce their choices in restaurants and significantly (statistically speaking) decrease their chances of needing to buy their grandchildren 10th birthday presents to their overstrained heart’s content.

In the space of 15-20years kids growing up will be in a completely smoke-free environment in the home (unless dirty old great uncle Frank is visiting).

How is that not a thing to sign, seal and deliver straight away?

It is literally a win/win/win/win situation.

The only thing I can’t fathom is why it is merely a ‘suggestion’ from the Queensland Cancer Council rather than something that is being rushed into law.

A friend argued that where will low income families be able to afford the money to pay the fines when their teenage kids are inevitably caught smoking illegally.

Well my pop used to say if you can afford a fast car you can afford to pay the speeding fine and the same goes here – if you can afford the small personal loan that goes with buying smokes these days, then you probably have a bit stashed away to pay the fine.

Sadly there are always nay-sayers but when it’s a laydown misere like this one you have to wonder at the motivations (and influences) behind the people in power.

This issue, at the end of the day, is about young children growing up not being exposed to second hand smoke in the home, and also giving teenagers the best chance at avoiding a life of cigarette addiction (and the subsequent financial strain)

Sure some will be lured in to that counter-culture just as many teens and young adults (and old adults) experiment with or regularly smoke marijuana.

But this is not about how many will, it is about how many WONT – and that number is too high for this not too happen right now.

The Meddler

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